Top Material Handling System Solution Provider

Top Material Handling System Solution Provider

Leading Material Handling System Solution Provider

PULSE Integration has been featured as a top material handling system solution provider for 2021 by Logistics Tech Outlook Magazine.

Logistic Tech Outlook provides an annual listing of 10 companies that are at the forefront of providing material handling system solutions and transforming businesses.  The magazine is read by over 68,000 subscribers who are key decision-makers in the logistics sector.

The magazine also features contributory articles from senior management executives from distribution, warehousing, manufacturing, supply chain experts, logistics professionals, and other technology decision makers on how material handling solutions improved operational performance in their organizations.

Read The Article Here

The Growing Digital Divide in Manufacturing

The Growing Digital Divide in Manufacturing

There is a growing consensus that digitization is opening up a chasm in the manufacturing industry.

On one side, there are the innovative, tech-savvy firms that are forging ahead full speed with digital transformation strategies, and reaping the benefits of doing so. On the other side, are businesses that have been slower to embrace the ‘Industry 4.0’ trend and who are at risk of falling behind as a result.

Deloitte reports that early adopters of smart factory initiatives have enjoyed average gains of 10 to 12% in areas such as manufacturing output, factory utilization and labor productivity. Research published in The Harvard Business Review found that digital leaders are 1.5 times more likely to optimize production runs based on demand forecast.

Moreover, there are fears that COVID-19 could make the divide even greater. According to a survey carried out by L.E.K, 51% of businesses with existing advanced digital capabilities plan to invest more in digitized operations in response to the pandemic, compared to 30% of firms overall.

It isn’t that the benefits of digitization are disputed. According to another study carried out by Deloitte, 69% of decision-makers said switching to a digital supply chain would deliver exponential or significant benefits to their business.

Yet only a third said they were prioritizing this as a strategic objective. Asked what the barriers to digitization were, the most common answer was budgetary constraints. Other issues cited included not knowing where to start, misalignment of competing priorities across the business, and difficulties making the long term business case within a rigid financial reporting framework.

Making Good the Promise

As far back as 2016, industry bodies were heralding mobile robotics as critical pieces in the jigsaw for achieving agile, efficient “always-on” supply chains. According to Robotics.org, the use of mobile robots as an intralogistics solution would streamline workflows, cut picking errors, boost throughput, consolidate space and offset rising labor shortages and costs.

These are all benefits that the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic bring into sharp relief. As a result, Interact Analysis has said that it believes the impact of the pandemic will lead to a long-term net rise in mobile robotics adoption.

“We believe that the impact of COVID-19 will lead to a long-term net positive for the mobile robot industry. E-commerce, near-shoring of manufacturing and adoption of robotics and automation to reduce reliance on human labor will all likely accelerate. This remains one of the most resilient and promising industries that we track.”
— Ash Sharma, MD & Senior Research Director - UK, Interact Analysis

That’s why PULSE Integration and OTTO partnered to undertake what is the world’s first in-depth analysis of automated mobile robots (AMRs) deployed at scale in industrial facilities.

How Retailers Can Win in Online Grocery Delivery

How Retailers Can Win in Online Grocery Delivery

According to Oracle’s latest grocery industry survey, 61% of consumers said they had ordered groceries online during the pandemic, with 41% now shopping online for their groceries more than in the store. Ninety-two percent of respondents also said they would likely continue shopping for their groceries online. 

The survey provided an interesting insight into the delivery and pickup preferences of customers who order their groceries online, with 3 out of 4 indicating they had their groceries delivered to their homes, 16% picking up their groceries inside the store and 11% opting for curbside. 

Covid-19 has made unattended delivery (no human contact with a delivery driver) a necessity, and this expectation is not going to change. Post pandemic, I believe there will be an even stronger demand for unattended delivery fulfillment as people begin to spend more time out of their homes again while continuing to order their groceries online. 

The Problem With Online Grocery Delivery

Online grocery ordering and delivery is becoming more strategic to grocery retailers.

In my role as a strategy consultant to some of the largest grocery retailers in the world, I’ve witnessed the growth of online grocery fulfillment. I’ve also seen the problems associated with this growth. For example, in my opinion, the worst business model ever created is online grocery ordering and fulfillment in its current format. Grocery retailers can lose up to $25 on every online order they fulfill. I’ve previously written about the costs associated with fulfilling online orders and how introducing micro-fulfillment will greatly reduce the costs and complexity associated with online grocery ordering and delivery. 

The best way for me to describe the process for delivering groceries to customers is that it is broken and getting worse. Grocery retailers are experts at running their stores, but most do a poor job of optimizing the logistics required to make deliveries. Out of fear of losing business to grocery retailers that offer online grocery ordering and delivery, most grocery retailers are offering the service.

However, instead of applying the science of supply chain management to increase the density of orders in specific regions to add more orders per delivery vehicle, retailers are embracing increased volume. This has resulted in the need for more associates to pick and fulfill orders along with an increased number of delivery drivers and vehicles. Because of a shortage of associates and delivery drivers, many grocery retailers are unable to fulfill orders to meet the delivery windows for their customers. 

To make matters worse, groceries are perishable. It is impractical, unsanitary and unsafe to deliver groceries to a home only to leave the groceries outside. However, the increased volume is making it difficult for grocery retailers to deliver all the groceries ordered online to their customers. Several grocery retailers recently contacted me to solve this problem: Even if they make deliveries between 6 a.m. and midnight, they are still unable to make all the required deliveries. Consumers are then abandoning grocery retailers that can’t deliver during the selected time window. 

The inability to keep up with the demand for grocery delivery has resulted in many retailers contracting third-party delivery companies. The problem with these companies is that they do not reflect the image or brand of the store. The use of third-party delivery services lacks accountability. 

Contract day workers answer an alert to fulfill a delivery for one of the many delivery service companies. There is no dress code, no company standard and no way to monitor or enforce accountability. I am frequently contacted by customers reporting an incident with a third-party delivery driver. The most common complaints I hear are that delivery drivers steal groceries, eat some of the food that was ordered or refuse to deliver the groceries to the customer without being tipped upfront. Less common but more serious complaints are of delivery drivers who have shown up high or drunk or have threatened customers. 

In order to not lose a sale, many grocers are willing to risk compromising delivery integrity. I hold senior executives at grocery retailers accountable for the breakdown of common courtesy and respect related to online grocery delivery. 

The Solution 

After researching online grocery deliveries globally for over two years, I believe several solutions are available to improve the service and delight customers. 

The first thing that has to occur is that grocery retailers need to understand that whoever wins the porch will win the battle for attracting and retaining customers. Retailers have to be willing to introduce technology to eliminate the current constraints associated with grocery delivery and provide customers with better service. 

Based on my research, I recommend that grocery retailers consider seeking temperature and climate-controlled container solutions that can be secured to a porch, garage, home or office, enabling customers’ completely unattended receipt of their order. Consider what items you’re fulfilling for customers — chilled and frozen products, medications, dry foods and so on —when selecting the appropriate solution. 

Grocery retailers should also explore installing temperature-controlled lockers in high-density locations to allow for mass delivery of groceries. Customers can pick up their groceries at their leisure. Retailers can also install this type of system at their stores. 

Retailers must raise the bar when it comes to last-mile delivery. Leveraging mobile retail or introducing the use of grocery delivery carts should become the norm. And finally, retailers should rethink their use of third-party delivery companies. Retailers should own the customer relationship, from online ordering to delivery, and insist on integrity at all times.

Grocery retailers that introduce these strategies and technologies into their businesses will help to protect the integrity of their delivery models, increase the customer experience and accelerate the growth of online ordering.

Read the full article in Forbes

AutoStore & PULSE Redefining The Consumer Experience!

AutoStore & PULSE Redefining The Consumer Experience!

AutoStore and PULSE are evolving to fulfill changing customer expectations, focusing on the flexible fulfillment system they need to meet their real-time demands. This video visualizes the unique benefits of AutoStore highlighting the primary USPs of the system, familiarizing the audience with main system modules, and visualizing fulfillment processes through simple, abstract visual metaphors.
Optimal Retailer Micro-Fulfillment Strategy

Optimal Retailer Micro-Fulfillment Strategy

Micro-fulfillment, as a solution for automating online grocery fulfillment and fulfillment of other retail products closer to customers, is growing in popularity among retailers. Amazon, Walmart, H-E-B, Ahold Delhaize and FreshDirect are just a few of the retailers that have embraced the use of micro-fulfillment technology.

However, for every retailer that has made the decision to enter into an agreement with a micro-fulfillment company to install its technology, there are dozens of retailers still stuck on answering the questions: How do we choose the right solution? How do we know what’s best for us?

Strategy First

A mistake that I continue to see made by certain retailers is that they select a micro-fulfillment solution without first having a micro-fulfillment strategy. Bad idea.

I have personally provided consulting to several retailers that selected and installed micro-fulfillment solutions only to discover that no value of any kind was derived in doing so. I was contracted to assess the current state of their operations and identify the optimal future-state strategy, and in each case, the failure on the part of the retailers to identify the optimal strategy created a situation whereby the micro-fulfillment technology provided no value. The situation could have easily been avoided by following an effective methodology and by working with a consulting company.

Precision Distribution Consulting (PDC) is one of the few consulting firms skilled in analyzing the value of micro-fulfillment solutions to a retailer and then identifying the optimal strategy for introducing micro-fulfillment solutions into the retailer’s ecosystem of stores. Kearney, Capgemini, Accenture and Deloitte also provide consulting services related to micro-fulfillment, as do McKinsey, The Boston Consulting Group and Bain & Company. (I do not have business relationships with these companies, but I am a former consultant for Capgemini and Deloitte).

The methodologies utilized by these consulting companies vary, but some critical elements include:

• Assessing each micro-fulfillment solution and selecting the best solution based on the requirements of the retailer.

• Building a current-state supply chain and logistics network model.

• Conducting scenario analysis to evaluate the impact of introducing micro-fulfillment technology into the retail network.

• Assessing changes required to manage inventory replenishment to each micro-fulfillment solution.

• Performing a “what if?” analysis to identify the total number of micro-fulfillment centers and automated dark stores a retailer should install within its retail ecosystem.

• Identifying the optimal future-state supply chain model to maximize the value of each micro-fulfillment center within the network.

• Building a business case outlining savings across labor and increased productivity to justify the investment in micro-fulfillment.

As a consultant, I’ve found determining the optimal strategy is the first step in every project that I lead. However, Covid-19, the growth of Amazon, changing consumer behavior away from stores to e-commerce and increased retail bankruptcies has resulted in many retail executives wanting to move fast into micro-fulfillment. I disagree with such an approach.

When confronted with an executive pushing to select and install a micro-fulfillment solution without first understanding the optimal strategy, I remind them of the exchange between Alice and the Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland:

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” asked Alice.

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.

“I don’t much care where,” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

“… so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added.

“Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said the Cat. “If you only walk long enough.”

Without a strategy, retailers have movement within their supply chains and operations but nothing more. Many people are in motion installing the selected micro-fulfillment solution, but the movement gets them nowhere, and the micro-fulfillment solution adds no value.

Selecting The Optimal Micro-Fulfillment Solution 

Once a retailer has identified the optimal micro-fulfillment strategy to meet its needs, the next step in the process is evaluating the different micro-fulfillment solutions available on the market.

The company I work for, PULSE Integration, has a business relationship with the micro-fulfillment company AutoStore. However, the purpose of this section isn’t to discuss AutoStore; it is to provide an overview of the leading micro-fulfillment solutions on the market and the key questions to consider during the selection process.

Whenever a retailer enters into an agreement with any micro-fulfillment company, the entire micro-fulfillment industry wins. I believe José Vicente Aguerrevere, Max Pedró and Rafael Pieretti V, founders of the company Takeoff, deserve credit for creating the modern-day micro-fulfillment industry. Other leading micro-fulfillment companies include Alert Innovation, Attabotics, Exotec, Dematic, Fabric and Tompkins Robotics.

Innovation is becoming increasingly important in the micro-fulfillment industry. For example, Takeoff is transitioning from a micro-fulfillment company to a software company capable of licensing its technology platform to retailers and micro-fulfillment companies to run all front-end and back-end operations related to online grocery ordering, fulfillment and operations.

At a high level, micro-fulfillment solutions are designed to do one thing: automate the process of fulfilling online grocery and e-commerce orders. Micro-fulfillment solutions are either shuttle-based or cube-based. There are positives and negatives of each.

A micro-fulfillment center can be installed inside every store to fulfill the curbside and online orders for a single store only. Micro-fulfillment centers can also be installed inside select store locations to fulfill curbside and online orders for many stores — a hub-and-spoke model. Again, there are pros and cons of each.

Retailers must first identify which model they prefer because that will determine the number of micro-fulfillment centers required to meet the demand for groceries from their customers. The model determines the strategy. My advice to all retailers is to assign someone from within their company who is experienced in micro-fulfillment to fairly evaluate all micro-fulfillment options or to partner with a third party that can lead the process.

There is no one-size-fits-all approach when selecting a micro-fulfillment solution.

Read the full article in Forbes